Retro Recap: Lazio vs Juventus, Serie A, March 18th 2001

For most of the ’90s Milan and Juventus had a stranglehold on the Serie A. But, as the new millenium dawned, Rome ruled the roost. Lazio won the 99/00 Scudetto, while Roma claimed top honours in 00/01.

Lazio were able to spend silly money under the ownership of Sergio Cragnotti, bringing in a slew of stars every summer. It was fun while it lasted. And, in March 2001, Lazio were still very much in the mix. As they hosted Juventus both needed to win in order to catch up with Roma who led the pack. We watched the match.

Minutes to jump around:

  • 0:00:00 What’s this all about?
  • 0:02:45 Cragnotti at Lazio
  • 0:09:00 Line-ups
  • 0:15:40 First Blood to Lazio
  • 0:21:10 Lazio start second half brightly
  • 0:24:45 Juve score with 10 men
  • 0:28:30 Lazio’s subs shine

Highlights!

CL Final 1997/98, Real Madrid vs Juventus; Doping in Football (S01E06.2)

After covering the history of Real Madrid in-depth in Part 1 as well as looking at the 97/98 season and the lead-up to the final, it’s time to actually talk about the match: Juventus are back for a third CL final in a row, having won their first and lost their second. Real Madrid have been waiting 32 years for La Séptima.

Here’s the audio (the arrow in the top right corner gets you an mp3 to download):

Here are the minutes, if you want to jump around:

  • 0:00:00 Intro
  • 0:01:30 What are Elo ratings? And how do they apply in (historical) football?
  • 0:06:30 The eve of the match
  • 0:11:00 Refs, kits, line-ups
  • 0:18:00 Kickoff, frantic start, general approach
  • 0:25:30 Zidane’s influence, penalty to Madrid?
  • 0:30:00 Madrid closer to the opening goal (Raul, Morientes)
  • 0:36:00 Davids vs Seedorf Pt 1, Madrid in command after the break
  • 0:42:15 Juve’s tactical changes & resurgence (Inzaghi twice), but Madrid
  • 0:46:00 Juve dial up the pace, finally throw in Conte
  • 0:51:30 Again no plan B for Juve?
  • 0:55:00 Handbags all around, Davids vs Seedorf Pt 2
  • 1:00:00 Awards & recommendation
  • 1:04:45 Aftermath, Heynckes out, Italian media reaction
  • 1:07:30 Court case against Juve’s medical team & doping in football
  • 1:22:00 Signing off

Awards! Our Man Of The Match went to Fernando Hierro, Best Hair to Antonio Conte. Clarence Seedorf and Edgar Davids earned commemorative plaques for their Outstanding Contribution in Man-to-Man Combat on the field. Case in point:

In the aftermath we covered the Juve doping scandal in detail. (YouTube to follow!) Years after their mid-90s dominance Roma’s former coach Zdeněk Zeman made thinly-veiled accusations that Juve’s success might have been aided by pharmaceuticals of the banned variety. This prompted an investigation, a court case, fines and jail sentences. To find out more, jump to around the 1h07m mark in the episode.

Further reading: In praise of Fernando Hierro, Real Madrid’s complete leader (These Football Times)

Continue reading

S01E06.1: An Incomplete History of Real Madrid, CL Season 97/98 in Review

Turns out, when you talk about the biggest club in the world of football, you could spend hours on their history. We tried to keep it to a manageable duration but decided to split the episode into two parts again. So with this part you’ll get the Champions League season 1997/98 (format, qualifying, groups, knock-out stage etc), Juve’s and Real’s domestic season and the lead up to the final. And the largest part of the episode is devoted to the Merengues.

In talking about the history of Real Madrid we track the club’s achievements and evolution through the decades by following a lineage of legends: Santiago Bernabéu Yeste, Francisco Gento, Santillana. We touch on the biggest stories and the important players and teams. It’s an “Incomplete History” as we look through the lense of 1998.

Here’s the show on Soundcloud, the little arrow in the top right let’s you download:

And here are the minutes:

  • 0:00:00 Intro & plugs
  • 0:02:20 Culture re-cap, Affleck vs Damon vs DiCaprio
  • 0:11:50 Champions League format 1997/98, Qualifying rounds
  • 0:18:50 Juve’s season (champions of Italy, out in QF of Coppa)
  • 0:24:20 Juve vs Kiev in the CL Quarters & vs Monaco in the Semis
  • 0:29:40 Real the biggest club in the world?
  • 0:32:30 Foundations of the Madrid Foot Ball Club, Santiago Bernabéu Yeste joins
  • 0:39:10 Construction of the Nuevo Estadio Chamartín
  • 0:45:30 The transfer of Alfredo Di Stefano to Real Madrid
  • 0:56:00 Real’s romp through Europe during the late 50s, Francisco Gento and the Ye-Ye
  • 1:02:00 Santillana, Quintra Del Buitre, drought in the early 90s
  • 1:07:45 Spanish league structure 95/96, Fabio Capello’s season at Real
  • 1:11:15 Jupp Heynckes’ coaching career & arrival in Madrid
  • 1:15:30 Real vs Leverkusen in the CL Quarters & vs Dortmund in the Semis

Let us know what you think about the episode, down below in the comments, over on Facebook or via Twitter.

Further reading:

Hilarity before the Champions League semi-final 1997/98 between Real and Dortmund after one of the goals fell over before kick-off; clip off of German TV show years later:

And here’s a full match for you, Real Madrid vs Eintracht Frankfurt in the European Cup final 1960 in front of 127K people in Glasgow:

S01E04.2: CL Final 1995/96, Ajax vs Juventus & Bosman ruling

Battered, bruised, completely knackered, shinguards sticking out of his socks, Moreno Torricelli cut the perfect figure to sum up the Champions League Final 1995/96. His side had held out against Ajax’ free-flowing style for two hours. By hook or crook they dragged the reigning champions into extra time, penalties even. It may have not been pretty to look at, but it was effective.

We did look at it though, talked about it as well.

But first, here’s Marcello Lippi all suave, smoking a cigar on the sideline at the match:

 

We already covered the lead-up to the match extensively in Part 1 of the episode, reviewing the Champions League season 1995/96, as well as re-capping Juve’s greatest sides and players. Listen to Part 1 here.

If you want to catch up with Juve’s history quickly, take a look at our “YYFP Shorts: An Incomplete History of Juventus” on our YouTube channel:

Coming into the final Ajax had retained the Dutch championship, whereas Juve only finished fourth in Serie A. Ajax beat Dortmund and Panathinaikos in the QF and SF respectively, Juve went through Real and Nantes.

Here’s the episode. As always, you can download from Soundcloud, and listen via iTunes, Stitcher, PlayerFM

Minutes:

  • 0:00:00 Intro, plugs for all the channels, Facebook and Twitter
  • 0:03:00 Quick re-cap and preamble for the final (refs, venue, kits and ceremony)
  • 0:08:00 Line-ups (Kluivert on bench, Overmars injured)
  • 0:17:20 Kick-off, Juve intensity and general set-up
  • 0:28:00 Ajax tactical approach, 1:0 to Juve, Ajax’ response, Del Piero’s role
  • 0:40:00 Goalkeeping by van der Sar and Peruzzi, Ajax equalize, Conte injured, Musampa off
  • 0:46:15 Ajax’ adjustments at Half-time, penalty to Juve? changes by both sides
  • 1:01:00 Extra time, defensive adjustments by Juve; Ajax dominate first half of ET, Juve the second
  • 1:06:00 Penalty shoot-out!
  • 1:10:00 Awards!
  • 1:17:45 Aftermath, Bosman ruling
  • 1:33:00 Ajax players infighting, moving on
  • 1:40:30 Holland at the Euros 1996, bust-up
  • 1:50:00 Signing off

This will have been the last time Ajax appear in our first series, so we took an extensive look at the Dutch giants in our aftermath. First we rolled up the Bosman ruling, which allowed EU players to transfer on a free once their contracts were up. The ruling passed in December 1995. Ajax were the first side really hit by it in the coming summer. Within a few years almost the entire squad of 1994-96 had moved on. Van der Sar and Litmanen held out the longest, until 1999.

The break-up had been some time coming though, as Ajax were strapped for cash when compared to the European heavyweights. This subsequently pitched the old guard and the youngsters on opposing sides. It didn’t help that the media spun this power struggle into a racial narrative.

Elftal at the Euro96, catch the story behind the picture in our show!

Elftal at the Euro96, catch the story behind the picture in our show!

Hope you enjoy Part 2 of the fourth episode. If you do, give us a like on Facebook, or leave us a review on iTunes.

Here is the full match, should you want to watch it. First half:

Second half:

Extra time & Penalties (Spoiler! yeez..):

S01E04.1: An Incomplete History of Juve, CL Season 95/96 in Review

Imagine for a second Roberto Baggio converting his penalty. That penalty. You know which one, because him skying it, somehow seems to define his whole footballing career. As if the nearly two decades Baggio played don’t matter.

An incredibly talented trequartista, Baggio’s career was almost over before it got started. Just after his move to Fiorentina in 1985 was confirmed, he ruptured his ACL. Baggio only made five league appearances in his first two seasons with the Viola.

Further reading: In Celebration of Roberto Baggio: The Divine Ponytail (These Football Times)

By the time the World Cup 94 rolled around, the 27-year-old had become world class. Baggio was voted WPOTY in 1993. He single-handedly dragged a mediocre Italy side into the final of Pasadena, scoring five goals in the process. In the shoot-out against Brazil Franco Baresi and Daniele Massaro also missed their penalties. And Baggio skyed his.

Why bring this up here, now?

For one, it shows how narrowly we think about past players. If Baggio makes the attempt and Italy win the World Cup, Il Divin Codino enters history as the greatest Italian player of all time. He’s still in the conversation, as he well should be, but at what point is he brought up? And does he get past the caveat that moment carries?

Further reading: Roberto Baggio: A Love Letter to Italy’s Forgotten Genius (Sabotage Times)

Two, and more imporant – at least on here – if Baggio makes that penalty, there is no chance in the world Juventus sell him a year later. And who knows what happens then in 95/96.

Further reading: Baggio vs. Lippi: The Anatomy of a Feud (These Football Times)

As it went down Baggio fell into a hole in 94/95, battling his own demons, the media and injuries.

Enter Pinturicchio: With Baggio sidelined, a 19-year-old Alessandro Del Piero bursts onto the scene and seizes the opportunity. By scoring goals like these.

Juve win the Scudetto in 94/95 for the first time in almost ten years. Throw in a Coppa to boot and we have our challenger for an Ajax side still firing on all cylinders.

Mercifully we split up Episode 4 into two. Part one clocks in at just under 2 hours and we only got up until the final. A big chunk is devoted to covering the history of Juventus, a trip through the decades highlighting their greatest sides and players, and of course the bust-up of Lippi and Baggio.

You can find the episode on Soundcloud (incl. MP3 to download), Stitcher, iTunes, or just use the nifty player here, minutes below:

  • 0:00:00 Intro
  • 0:04:15 Culture re-cap: Academy Awards 1996, Wrestlemania XII
  • 0:14:00 Kanu and Nigeria at the Olympics ’96, Diego Simeone and Argentina at the Copa ’95
  • 0:18:40 CL qualification round feat. Anorthosis vs Rangers, Rosenborg vs Besiktas, Anderlecht vs Ferencvaros
  • 0:23:30 Dinamo Kiev banned for attempted bribery, Groups A and B
  • 0:30:45 An overlook of Juve’s history, their greatest sides and triumphs
  • 0:48:30 Juve in 1994: Marcelo Lippi comes in, Roberto Baggio is led go
  • 1:00:00 Difference in coaching approaches between Lippi and van Gaal
  • 1:06:00 Juve’s domestic season (95/96), quality of Serie A, Milan, Sampdoria
  • 1:16:30 Ajax’ moves in the summer, early trophies
  • 1:25:00 Quarter finals feat. Real vs Juve, Nantes vs Spartak Moscow, Ajax vs Dortmund, Legia vs Panathinaikos
  • 1:35:15 Nantes founding history and ’60s success; semi finals feat. Nantes vs Juve, Ajax vs Panathinaikos
  • 1:50:00 More theories about the impossibility of defending the CL title

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